bi-weekly recirculation cleaning

At Draft Doctor, we take draft cleanliness very seriously. Our cleaning procedure adheres to the guidelines agreed upon by the Brewers' Association and all leading draft system manufacturers. Additionally, a clean system will help your bottom line by increasing sales and guest retention.

  • We clean all our accounts every two weeks with an alkaline detergent cleaner, with an additional quarterly acid cleaning cycle to remove beer stone.
  • Chemical is circulated for a minimum of 20 minutes using a flow rate of two gallons/minute. We do not recommend so-called "static pot" cleaning, as it provides an inferior clean compared to pumped recirculation.
  • Lines are rinsed fully with water after cleaning - for safety reasons we do not waste your beer/cider on rinsing the lines.
  • All faucets are completely disassembled and cleaned every visit.
  • A full system check of all O-rings and serviceable parts is carried out every visit.

The Importance of draft beer line cleaning

Clean beer lines are integral to maintaining the quality of craft beer.

Small and independent craft brewers devote a lot of time, effort and resources to make the best possible beer for consumers. Ingredients are handpicked, the latest technological advances in brewing are used and batches of beer are tested throughout the process to ensure superior quality. That hard work can be ruined in the time it takes the beer to travel from the keg to the glass if the draft system/lines have not been properly cleaned and maintained.

The enemies of draft beer may include the following:

Yeast

White or grey-colored surface growth found on beer system components (faucets, keg couplers and drains) that are exposed to air.

Mold

Brown or black-colored surface growth found on beer system components (faucets, keg couplers and drains) that are exposed.

Beer stone

Grey or brown in color, (calcium oxalate) builds up and eventually flakes off if the system is not properly maintained, potentially ending up in the pint and having a negative effect on appearance and taste.

Bacteria

Beer-spoiling bacteria will ruin a beer’s flavor and aroma. While these micro-organisms are not health risks, they will cause buttery off-flavors called diacetyl, or sour, vinegary off-flavors called acetic acid.

All of these enemies of beer are easily preventable by regular line cleaning, but if left unattended will inevitably lead to dissatisfied customers and lost revenue.